Review: Children’s Book on Adult Subject–Something for everyone

As the book’s cover says, “One summer can change your whole life”, and Frank Viva in his texts and “toons” proves it can change the individual as well. Sea Change, a children’s book written and illustrated by Frank Viva, is one of the best “reads” I’ve ever been able to get through in one day. More a coming-of-age (both physically and maturity-wise)story, than a children’s book, the story deals with Eliot, a twelve year old boy. It is a chapter book, but also aimed at “the visual learner” by Toons Graphics.  It is cartoonish, but in an artsy way.

Eliot is upset that his parents plan for him to spend summer in Port Aconi, Nova Scotia, with his Great Uncle Earl, in a tiny fishing village where Uncle Earl is a professional fisherman living in an old house. The first friend he makes is Happy, Uncle Earl’s dog, who connects to the feeling-sorry-for-himself Eliot. He gradually does make new friends, including Mary Beth, who gives him his first-ever kiss.

Many of the scenes are told by graphic drawings; for example, the time the fishermen see the Great White Shark impresses the reader with the size of the creature and the danger of the situation. The lines of text often swirl and move all over the page as one reads, but never to the point where the reader loses the continuity or “loses his place” and has to re-read.

During the course of the summer, Eliot discovers Uncle Earl’s “hidden library” and shares his time there with a younger new friend, Timmy. Eliot learns a lot from Timmy, and Timmy idolizes Eliot. Problems arise, of course, in the form of juvenile delinquent, Donnie, and the fact that Eliot can’t swim and is afraid of spiders and thunderstorms.  “Old Miss Gifford,” a school teacher, manages to fix all the problems, including the very adult one of child abuse. The lesson children learn from this book is, “Tell an adult!”

The most interesting part of the book is the change this one summer brings about in Eliot. On the flight to Nova Scotia, the stewardess treats Eliot as the little boy that he is, giving him plastic pilot’s wings and inviting him to the cockpit to meet the pilot. Eliot’s reaction is a little boy’s–delight and glee at both.  On the flight home, the same stewardess sees a pensive, almost troubled individual, whom she does not recognize and addresses Eliot as “young man;” for indeed over the single summer Eliot has grown up.

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Author: Rae Longest

This year, I will have been a member of AAUW (American Association of University Women) for fifty years, a life time member (which means my fellow AAUW members will begin to pay my annual dues. (ha ha) In the 80's we began a book group to share our love of reading, books,and fellowship with other women and girls who loved the same. We resurrected the group on-line in September of 2015 and went on from there (See "Introduction",first blog). This is my first experience at blogging or publishing anything and is becomes more fun with each blog posted. I am currently teaching as an adjunct at The University of Houston Clear Lake. This makes my 27th year there after three years at Alvin Community College and an almost-twenty year career as a classroom teacher with Alvin Independent School District. Reading and writing are "in my blood" just like teaching is. I hope you enjoy the blog.

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