SATURDAY MORNINGS FOR KIDS

Today’s choice, a winner of the Newberry Medal in 1977, and nominated for the National Book Award, is a “classic” I’d heard about and even recommended to my junior high students during the 70s. Ironically enough, I’d never read it until this week. Mildred D. Taylor’s Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry bears a cover that would attract anyone, child and adult alike.  There is a young African American girl in bib-overalls holding tightly to two younger boys as flames and fire threaten the place where they are standing, their house.

I have just begun reading, enjoying the author’s fine writing style as she describes the three Logan children joining other children on their long, dusty trek to their first day of school.  Once there, by “showing, not telling”, she makes clear the inequality of education of the black and white students. The cover blurbs inform me that the story is set in the Great Depression in the deep South. I hope to read it tonight and tomorrow, then place it in my Little Free Library. The sun is supposed to come out Sunday after several days of cold, rainy and overcast weather. Perhaps families will be taking “after-Sunday-dinner” walks and will stop off to get choose a book for the evening.

Author: Rae Longest

This year (2019) finds me with 50 years of teaching "under my belt." I have taught all levels from pre-K "(library lady" or "book lady"--volunteer) to juniors, seniors, and graduate students enrolled in my Advanced Writing class at the university where I have just completed 30 years. My first paying teaching job was junior high, and I spent 13 years with ages 12-13, the "difficult years." I had some of the "funnest" experiences with this age group. When I was no longer the "young, fun teacher," I taught in an elementary school setting before sixth graders went on to junior high, teaching language arts blocs, an assignment that was a "dream-fit" for me. After completing graduate school in my 40s, I went on to community college, then university teaching. Just as teaching is "in my blood," so is a passion for reading, writing, libraries, and everything bookish. This blog will be open to anyone who loves books, promotes literacy and wants to "come out and play."

4 thoughts on “SATURDAY MORNINGS FOR KIDS”

  1. This sounds like a promising read – here’s hoping Sunday stay dry. I bought a large, old fashioned umbrella today to keep in the boot of my car, given how much it rained during this last week… Have a lovely relaxing day tomorrow, Rae:)

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I have a close connection to this book. My dad is roughly the author’s age. My dad and the author grew up on either side of the Mississippi River from each other. Both my dad’s parents and the parents in the story were farmers. Both sets of parents took on extra jobs when times for farming were precarious. Both sets of parents were extremely hard working, were excellent parents, and had a tremendous respect for education.

    But there is one big difference between the two families. My dad’s family is white, and the characters in the story is black.

    That one thing changed everything.

    Liked by 1 person

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