SATURDAY MORNINGS FOR KIDS ON SATURDAY EVENING

Because I had books to box, cookies to bake, and candy to make for my “Celebration of Everything Bookish” at the Alvin Library today, I am not getting to my book recommendation or Saturday morning post until now.

The Sunken Tower by Tait Howard, sent to me by Oni Press, is a study in artwork and adventure. I am not sure whether I enjoyed the colorful, exciting artwork of this graphic novel for kids more or the great, life-lesson-filled adventures of its heroes. Digby, its main character, is the least heroic figure one can imagine, but his powers revealed at the end surprise both the reader and himself. The three pages which chronicle in wonderful art the demise of the monster by one of Digby’s spells is only rivaled by the complex relationship of Digby and his fellow dungeon-mates, Iona and Crina, who all become good friends as they escape becoming a sacrifice for the creatures of the blood cult wishing to bring their cult back to its “glory days.”

Even the graphic design of the letters of the title give clues about the Sunken Tower. Oni Press will release this eye-catching, exciting book in March of 2020, and fans of graphic stories and action-packed adventures will enjoy this read.

TUESDAY TEASER

This little game, originally started by the Purple Booker asks that you copy a couple of sentences from what you are currently reading to tease someone into reading the same book you are. Be careful not to give anything away (no spoilers, please). In the comments section, please include the title and author of the book you are reading, then your Tuesday Teaser.

Mine for today is from a YA book, The Lightning Thief  by Rick Riordan: The three main characters are about to hitch a ride from a van carrying old, tired zoo animals to the West Coast where the three (all of whom have a superhuman side to them) are to carry on their quest to save the world.

“We huddled in the corner on some mildewed feed sacks, trying to ignore the smell and the heat and the flies.  Grover talked to the animals in a series of goat bleats (Grover is a young satyr) but they just stared at him sadly.  Annabeth was in favor of breaking the cages and freeing them on the spot, but I pointed out that it wouldn’t do much good until the truck stopped moving. Besides, I had a feeling that we might look much better to that lion than those turnips.” (which was all that the lion had been given to eat)  The main character, Percy, is the son of Poseidon, which he doesn’t find out until junior high school when strange things begin to happen to him and strange creatures are “out to get him.” Of course the other kids in the school think he is just weird.

The book is entertaining and a good adventure-read.