Every Other Sunday (Evening) Post

Yes, yes, I know it’s Saturday evening, not Sunday, but I’m going to have such a full Sunday (and Monday, and Tuesday) that I thought while I had a minute to breathe, I’d do so while posting a catch up on what I’ve been reading.

Finished over the past two weeks:

News of The World    This is the Third Tuesday Book Club’s October selection, which I read by mistake, but enjoyed greatly.  Read the recent review of this fine western/historical fiction novel about Texas on this blog.  I believe this fine novel is the Gulf Coast Read for this year.

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, which will be reviewed early next week.

Lilac Girls, a WWII novel of sisterhood which includes the Holocaust from both the Polish and German point of view along with the fall of France and its liberation.  This novel will also be reviewed soon.

Continuing to read:

Wizards and Glass Book IV of Stephen King’s “The Dark Tower Series.”  I believe this is my second favorite in the Dark Tower Series, the first being Wolves of the Calla, Book V. (Yes, I read them out of order.)

Our America: A Latin American History of the United States

Began this week:

Debbie Mcomber’s non-fiction, anecdotal book, One Simple Act: Discovering the Power of Generosity

Rules of Prey by John Sanford, reminiscent of “Criminal Minds” on TV, but with a single investigator, not a team, working on the bizarre case.

I obviously have a great deal of good reading to continue until I write this post again, but my reading time is limited. Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday are chock full with church and a student session in the afternoon, a doctor’s appointment and errands on M and a Sunday School coffee here after class on Tuesday.  Wednesday is my full day at the university ; then Thursday after class I hope to spend some time with friends (mother and teenage daughter) whom I haven’t seen since pre-Harvey.  It seems like everything is measured in terms of before and after Harvey these days.  Hopefully as the streets are cleared of debris and we begin to accept our “new normal,” the nightmares of Harvey will fade, and we will begin looking forward to Halloween, Thanksgiving, the semester’s end, and Christmas.  Sometimes it’s nice to look ahead…

 

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EVERY-OTHER SUNDAY (EVENING) POST

A quick listing,catch-up is all I have time for tonight, for I still have six, five page Argument/Research papers to grade before tomorrow’s 8:00 am class.

What I finished: The Address, a superb second novel by Fiona Davis, which I will review tomorrow or the next day.

Daughter of Time, reviewed recently on this site.

Today’s Sunday Edition of The Houston Chronicle, a reward for all the hard work I’ve done this weekend.

What I am continuing to read:

A wonderful book of poetry, Poetic Rituals, by a blogging friend.  I have shared several of these poems with  my students in those “settling-down-and-getting-ready-to-start-class-for-real” times. (These occur frequently with an 8 o’clock class!)

Our America: A Hispanic History of the United States, which I confess I haven’t touched or opened this week.  High hopes for next week.

What I have begun:

The Leavers (see excerpt on Tuesday’s Teaser) by Lisa Ko

I have spent my time grading each evening, into the night, doing some much needed grocery shopping and some fine meal planning and cooking (and freezing in preparation for the end of the semester (6 days to go!) when I KNOW I won’t have time to cook and will just want to “warm up something.” My Better Half bought a lovely cheese and fruit tray home today.  We added potato salad from the deli and pan-grilled chicken hot dogs, complimented by pita chips, and we had a light, healthy lunch.  We are trying to eat our main meal at noon which is easier on senior citizen digestions and nocturnal early bedtimes.  Five thirty or six o’clock comes mighty early in the mornings.

SUNDAY EVENING POST

My Sunday Evening Post has turned into an every-other-Sunday-post, so today’s post will be a catch up for the past two weeks.

I Finished:

The Book of Awesome Women  a wonderful book which was my first “professional review.” (see previous post, please)

bel hooks’ Feminism is for Everyone, a book which explained today’s brand of feminism vs. the “militant” feminism of the 70’s and 80’s.  It was enlightening and educational.

Children’s Books: The Classroom at the End of the Hall, Punished, Ida B., Saving Zsasha, and Mister and Me     All were chapter books, some with more chapters than others, but because they were for junior high and below, they were fast reads.

The Houston Chronicle’s Sunday Edition for each of the two weeks.  This is my fun thing to do on Sunday afternoons when it is too hot to go out or to go anywhere here in Texas.

The Good American, which will be reviewed next week

Jo Jo Moyes’ Paris for One and Other stories, a novelette and eight other very short short stories  (To be reviewed next week also)

I am Continuing to Read:

Poetic Rituals by author and blogger Ritu Bhatal   I am so glad I bought this book of poems.  I just wish I could make it last longer.  I reward myself with two or so poems each day.

The Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey a mystery published in large print in 1951   I have just begun but am totally intrigued.

I worked on:

The plans for my Bookworm Club which starts Tuesday

The syllabus and curriculum (plus lesson plans) for my Comp II class that begins at the local community college Wednesday.

I have been a busy girl and enjoyed visiting with friends (and a couple of doctors) these past two weeks as well.

Here’s hoping the week ahead is good for me and for you.  Happy Reading!

 

 

SUNDAY (EVENING) POST

This has been an “off week”, and I took advantage of it by making it a reading week. Tuesday through today (Sunday) my main activity has been reading.

I have finished:

Who Is the Human? by Gary Pegoda — Reviewed recently on this blog.  Good sci-fi action.

The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend by Katarina Bivald–Reviewed recently on this blog.

Setting Free the Kites by Alex George–a recent library impulse selection chosen because it was large print and thoroughly enjoyed.  To be reviewed on this blog soon.

The Devil’s Highway by Alberto Urrea–Reviewed recently on this blog.

Continuing to Read:

Set aside temporarily, Garth Stein’s A Sudden Light

My non-fiction attempt to expand my genre preferences, bell hooks’s Feminism is For Everybody: Passionate Politics  I have barely begun, but I feel I should read bel hooks.

A book recommended by a fellow blogger at Brainfluff, The Keeper of Lost Things by Ruth Hogan
A Kindle Purchase written by a blogging friend Notes from a Small Dog by Ani

Watched:

The rest of the TV series, “Genius”, the story of Albert Einstein’s life and work

Rick Steves’ Europe on PBS, Went to Germany, twice; Scotland; parts of England.  I never get tired of him as a tour guide nor his show.  We often watch during meals since they are only thirty minutes long.

Movie, “The  Magdalene Sisters–brutal! A true story from Ireland.

Next week brings doctor’s visits and a few fun things as well, and of course, LOTS of reading!

 

Sunday (Evening) Post

Because I read several books at a time, I often finish several near the same time as well. During the past two weeks, I finished the following books:

The Devil’s Highway by Luis Urrea, a story of the US Border Patrol and its policies toward illegal immigrants–This book was one that although non-fiction, read like a novel, and I polished it off in two days.

Sophie’s World took much longer because it was full of philosophy and required thinking about while one followed the plot of an-about-to-be-fifteen year old girl.  It was educational as well as entertaining.

Before We Visit the Goddess by Chitra Divakaruni, a Houston writer I had read before took only a day and an evening, for it was so good that I stayed up late to finish it.

Gary Pegoda’s sci-fi novel,Who Is Human? also took more time because I had it on my Kindle app and was adjusting to the first novel read in that format, because it was very thought-provoking, and because I often found myself slowing down to admire the excellent writing.

For the time being, I had put aside Garth Stein’s (author of Racing in the Rain, a heartbreaking but engaging novel, told from a dog’s point of view) A Sudden Light in order to return Divakaruni’s novel to the library on time.  I hope to return to it this coming week.

I have just begun the large print version of Katarina Bivald’s The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend, also borrowed from the library, which has me laughing out loud and totally delighted by page 355 in just two days.

I did manage to work in the Sunday edition of The Houston Chronicle as my guilty pleasure for a Sunday afternoon, something I reward myself with when I’ve worked hard on various things all week.

I have had out-of-state company all week, and although we have had a lovely time and wonderful visit, I will be glad to have some peace and quiet (they have an 8 year old and a ten year old, brilliant and sweet kids, but exhausting to an old woman like me LOL) before starting teaching summer school at the local college in July. I am sure once the family is out the door I will be missing the happy laughter from the many games of Uno played on the living room floor and the delicious authentic Chinese meals the father of the family has made for us.  I feel like it has been Mother’s Day (week) instead of Father’s Day because of the royal treatment I have been receiving.

I have plans to get some reading done before I get caught up in lesson plans and grading, perhaps I’ll start right now…

Sunday (Evening) Post

It is back to reading, coming with a few rainy days in a row.  I had about finished up several books, so this past few days, I have started a few “new” ones. Striving to work some non-fiction into my reading, my “grandson” loaned me a very readable non-fiction work by Luis Alberto Urrea, The Devil’s Highway, which deals with immigrants’ desperate attempts to achieve a better life in this country and the work of the US Border Patrol.  I am only on chapter two, but am thoroughly “hooked.” I am looking forward to reading more on this book this coming week.

Last week I started a unique review of Philosophy 101 in novel form in the YA “classic”, Sophie’s World by Jostein Gaardner.  The introduction to this, the 20th anniversary edition, by the author is enough to stimulate anyone’s curiosity, and the novel itself is extremely engaging. In a week’s time I have read a little over one half of this hefty, thought provoking, mysterious novel. I also began Garth Stein’s (author of Racing in the Rain) A Sudden Light, also a mysterious, somewhat supernatural novel written in 2014. I am only on chapter seven, which is scarcely into the book, as the chapters are pleasantly short.  All of these books are keeping me reading.  I am also continuing with Gary Pegoda’s Who Is Human?  on my Kindle app on my laptop.  I am definitely going to ask for a real Kindle for my birthday coming up, for the glare does not allow me to read for long periods of time.  The story just keeps getting more and more interesting, and although I cannot predict where it is going, I want to keep reading to find out.

We have been turning the house upside down and inside out, placing new furniture and moving pieces from room to room.  Our sixteen year old cat, Lena, is most upset because nothing is where it used to be (except for the granite topped table in the breakfast room and the large dining room table and assorted furniture in the dining room), and she seems somewhat disoriented and confused.  As long as she has her “box”, food and water bowls, and a window next to the window seat to look out of, I think she will be fine.

The PWR ladies met last Sunday (I was too exhausted to do a Sunday (Evening) Post last week because we had such a good time, and although our numbers were small, we had a lovely visit, and we were able to send attendees home with sandwiches for husbands for supper and various baggies full of “snacks” for the coming week.) It was a matter of quality time, and considering that it was Memorial Day Weekend and many had family plans, I was especially pleased.  Everyone took home some books to read, and a couple brought books to loan and magazines for my Bookworm Club (which will meet in July)which we will use to cut up for vocabulary “projects.”

It was a good week, and the week ahead promises to hold many good things as well. I wish the same for you and yours.

Sunday (Evening Post)

This week has been filled with trips to the mall to visit and walk the mall with a friend from Las Vegas, and going four days in a row (each day a larger percentage off) to an estate sale down the road where we purchased a bedside table in anticipation of visitors from Boston in June and a roll-top desk as an early anniversary present to each other. We also brought some smaller items none of which we needed, but all  nice additions to our house and lifestyles.  Because of the unusual busyness, I did very little reading.

I finished Vanishing Grace by Phillip Yancey, borrowed from the church library, which I returned this morning.  A review follows soon.

I am continuing to read The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas which deals with a white on black shooting and is so interesting that I am halfway to three fourths of the way through.

I started an old book, Tender Mercies by Taylor Caldwell that a friend brought to donate to my LFL when she attended a book party, and I am wondering why I haven’t heard of it before? It is old-fashioned, but wonderful.

I have been cooking this week: Greek lemon-roasted golden potatoes, spaghetti and meatballs, roast beef in the crockpot, and fresh green beans and new potatoes from a friend’s garden.  We are eating well.

It is hot on the Gulf Coast of Texas, hitting 90 degrees, at least, each day with 0ver 85 to 90 percent humidity.  Whew! With washing clothes, taking extra showers, and watering the plants, I dread seeing my water bill!

The Powerful Women Readers’ “Hen Party” is next Sunday, so I have another busy week ahead, shopping and cleaning in anticipation of that. I have read and prepared book talks on all three “assigned” books, but this get together will focus on food, fellowship and fun.