TUESDAY TEASER

You, too, can participate. Simply open a book you’re currently reading, copy a couple of sentences from a random page, and we’ll see if we’re tempted to add the book to our TBR (To Be Read) list.  Be sure to give us the title and author, and please avoid spoilers.

Here’s mine from Freeks by Amanda Hocking:

“Since we’d gotten to Caudry, I’d had these weird flashes of cold, especially in my chest, but that was all.  There I was , mere feet away from this super-powerful water, and everybody else’s senses were going wacko.” (The characters are called “freeks” because they have super-powers.) “That was all the proof I needed that I didn’t have the same ‘gift’ as my mother.”

Monday (Afternoon) Musings

Here I sit, running late once again, but with a good excuse.  I just finished the classic, Coming of Age in Mississippi by Anne Moody, and I am filled with things I would like to say to the young protagonist of this memoir.  Because of this feeling of a need/desire to communicate with a character in something I’ve read, I would like to provide the venue for you to do the same.

Post here by typing in the reply box a letter, e-mail, or simply address the protagonist of the book you are currently reading.  I am going to set a deadline of January 20th for posting your communication here. If you cannot maneuver the necessities for posting yourself, click on “contact me” and type in your letter/note there, which I will copy and attach to this post.

I am looking forward to you thinking about what you would say to your book’s character in writing.

TUESDAY TEASER

Ok, PWR members and friends thereof, it’s time for your Tuesday Teaser.  Let us know what you’re currently reading by randomly opening your book and copying two or so lines to tease us into adding your current read into our TBR (To Be Read) List. Be careful not to include any spoilers.   Here’s mine from The Cat, The Quilt, and The Corpse, a cozy mystery by Leann Sweeney from her “Cats in Trouble” series:

Several crates of cats which had been rescued from the dead cat-stealer’s house have just arrived at the cat-quilter’s home for temporary fostering.  “The Siamese  began wailing its head off, and my three [cats] ventured into the foyer to check out the noise.  Merlot (one of her cats) took one look at those crates (full of rescued cats), hissed and hightailed it back to wherever he’d been hiding.  But apparently Syrah (her second cat) wasn’t bothered, and Chablis (her third cat) was too drugged to care about possible unwelcome visitors.”

Who was this derelict dead man who had stolen her precious cat? And more important, who had stabbed him to death?  If only the cat could talk.

 

Monday Morning Musings

Every so often I’ll get a call from a former student who is originally from Bejing.  It has been years since she was in my Intermediate Writing class, mostly filled with international students, but she still considers me her teacher–a fact which pleases me a great deal. Sometimes she wants to know what an American expression or idiom means.  Recently I made a list of commonly used idioms and am going to share them this rainy morning:

“Let the cat out of the bag” or “spill the beans” means to tell a secret unintentionally.  Ex. I thought your daughter knew you were thinking about moving.  I didn’t mean to let the cat out of the bag.

“Bite the dust” means to die.  In the Wild West, a cowboy who was shot “bit the dust.”

“When pigs fly” means it (whatever you’re talking about) isn’t ever going to happen.  Ex. I will let my son go to see that trashy movie when pigs fly.

“Heard it through the grapevine” means one heard something from gossip exchanged person to person.  Ex. Mrs, Jones is getting a divorce.  I heard it through the grapevine.

“Go cold turkey” means to quit something suddenly and completely. Ex. I gave up cigarettes cold turkey.

A “wet blanket” is someone who ruins all the fun.  Ex. Don’t invite Mary to the party; she’s a wet blanket.

When one is “talking up a blue streak,” he/she is talking very fast.  Ex. The two ladies seated at the corner table were talking up a blue streak.

“Sit tight” means do not do anything until you are told what to do next. Ex. Until you hear from me about applying for the loan, sit tight.

These are just a few of the hundreds, maybe thousands of idioms used in daily American speech.

Which ones do you hear all the time?  Scroll way down and leave a reply.  The box will open up for you. List an idiom you have heard, or if there is an expression/idiom that is not clear, use “reply” to ask what it means.

“Be seeing you” means goodbye for now.