SATURDAY MORNINGS FOR KIDS ON SATURDAY EVENING

Thanks, Carla, for the use of your illustration .

Saturday mornings on PWR (Powerful Women Readers) are reserved for recommendations of kids’ books, just like Saturday morning TV programming in the 50s and 60s (cartoons) was. Today’s recommendation is a whole series.

Gators are funny, and when they play detective, they become even funnier.

I found this particular 2020 publication in my Little Free Library and had a ball looking it over. John Patrick really knows what tickles kids’ funny bones. It is done as a graphic novel, and I’m glad I began with Book One. The illustrations are priceless and the word balloons are easy to follow. Any precocious 8-year-old could read it to himself, but a 5-year-old could appreciate the jokes as he was being read to. Even reluctant readers as old as thirteen are sure to enjoy the slapstick and even more subtle jokes and will enjoy following the plots.

I highly recommend this whole series after examining the first book, firsthand, and looking over the other books in the series online. It is a reader-starter for those who are independent, avid readers as well as those who prefer computer games to “plain old books.” Best of all–they are F.U.N.N.Y.

SATURDAY MORNINGS FOR KIDS

Just as Saturday morning TV programming was reserved for kids during the 50s and 60s, PWR reserves Saturday Mornings for kids’ books.

Today’s selection is a book I ordered for my niece’s husband (and his daughter age 4) to read together. They are both huge Star Wars fans.

I have seen Jeffrey Brown’s cartoons before, but this one is priceless!

Imagine Darth Vader, in full regalia, seated at an outer space bar with a four-year-old Luke Skywalker in his Jedi clothes, admonishing Luke, “Don’t make bubbles”, as little Luke blows instead of sips his beverage. Throughout the book, Darth Vader protects and corrects his son in a fatherly way until by the end of the book, when Little Luke hugs Darth’s leg and says, “I love you, Dad,” we are inclined to feel that perhaps good ole Darth “ain’t so bad after all.” At the end, Vader’s Little Princess is mentioned as another Brown book, one which is a MUST for my father-daughter duo.

I know, I know I promised myself I’d order no books until I whittled down my TBR shelves, but this one was TOO GOOD TO PASS UP!

SATURDAY MORNINGS FOR KIDS

THANKS CARLA FOR THE LOVELY MEME!

Just as Saturday mornings on TV during the 50s and 60s, PWR reserves Saturday mornings for kids. This is my recommendation for kids for 6/18/22:

I found this book at my local library when I was looking for a book with a compound word in its title for a challenge. It turned out I had a title with a compound word on my TBR shelf (Mt TBR Challenge), so I used that one for the challenge (What’s in a Name challenge), killing two birds with one book.

I did read this book though, and decided to use it for a Saturday Mornings for Kids review since it was too good not to share. Basically, it was written and illustrated (LOVED the illustrations!) to teach the concept of compound words.

THIS PAGE SAYS, “SOMETIMES WHEN WE’RE READING, WE MIGHT SEE A BIG, LONG WORD.” THEN ON THE NEXT PAGE…”THEN FIND IT’S MADE OF SMALLER ONES AS IN THIS ONE: ‘BLUEBIRD’. “

MANY COMPOUND WORDS ARE INCLUDED IN THE TEXT, SOME OF THEM NOT AS FAMILIAR AS THE FIRST ONES THAT COME TO MIND.

SEE WHAT I MEAN ABOUT THE ILLUSTRATIONS–MARVELOUS!

HAPPY READING KIDS!

Rae

SATURDAY MORNINGS FOR KIDS…

SATURDAYS ON PWR, LIKE TV PROGRAMING IN THE 50s AND 60s WHICH SHOWED CARTOONS BETWEEN 6:30 AND 9:00, IS DEDICATED TO KIDS.

…ON SATURDAY NIGHT.

Late again! It has been an eventful, productive day, but I failed to post one of my much anticipated things in a long while.

This past spring, one of my favorite children’s authors paid me a visit at my home in Alvin. She brought her fabulous kids and we had a lovely visit. She even stopped and brought lunch–now, that’s the kind of company to have!

Alda, Annabel, and Nate look at the books I had been Saving for them since Christmas.

Alda P. Dobbs wrote the Bluebonnet nominated The Barefoot Dreams of Petra Luna, a wonderful tale of a Mexican ten-year-old, caught up in the Mexican Revolution. Her adventures are based on stories Alda’s great grandmother told her when she was young.( Use the search box to find my review of this excellent book.) In September, 2022, Alda Dobbs will publish the sequel, The Other Side of the River. She signed a copy of the book for me, and I greedily read it in one weekend.

This book continues the story of Petra Luna as she becomes an immigrant in the U.S. One would think when she managed to cross into the States, her problems would be solved, but they are only beginning . How she deals with and solves these problems leads the reader to a very satisfying ending.

I am always happy to tell people that I have a friend who is a well-known, well-respected children’s author, but even happier when she and her lovely kids come to see me. Soon I will review On The Other Side of the River, so you can pre-order and plan the time for a pleasant weekend of fantastic reading.

Until later…

SATURDAY MORNINGS FOR KIDS

LIKE SATURDAY MORNING TV PROGRAMING BACK IN THE 50’s and 60’s, SATURDAY MORNINGS ON PWR IS RESERVED FOR KIDS.

Being only certified to teach sixth grade through twelfth, I never taught fifth grade during my almost twenty years in public schools. I have, however, taught fifth graders in Sunday school for a couple of years. Candace Fleming, author of The Fabled Fifth Graders of Aesop Elementary School, describes the adventures and misadventures of “almost sixth-graders”in a way that can only be captured by someone who has taught elementary school, or who has had kids in fifth grade, or who has a remarkable memory of her fifth grade year of school.

A humorous, warm book that will appeal to readers in grades four through sixth.

Mr. Jupiter’s fifth grade class has a definite reputation. They are remembered vividly if not fondly, as a group by their first through third grade teachers, some of whom, thanks to these “characters” are no longer teaching or are on “medical leave.” Mr. Jupiter was their fourth grade teacher, and now, when no one can be found to take on these “special” group of fifth graders, he moves up to teach fifth grade. Readers are carried on a journey of “the zaniest school year yet.”

The book is appropriately arranged in fables, complete with morals, chronicling the stories of individual student’s experiences during their fifth grade year. Evidently, a budding attraction between Mr. Jupiter, then their fourth grade teacher, and Miss Turner, the librarian, blossoms into a full-fledged romance during the course of the story. Perhaps it would be even more fun to meet these kids during their fourth grade year before reading this 2010 publication. However, the Fifth Graders works well as a standalone. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and highly recommend it.

KEEP ON READING KIDS!

Thanks, Carla, for the loan of this illustration.

Saturday mornings were mornings not to disturb parents who were sleeping in, grab a bowl of Frosted Flakes in our Tony the Tiger bowl we received from sending in cereal boxtops, and to sit down in front of the TV to watch cartoons. That was the 50’s and 60’s go-to plan. TV programming was tuned in to this phenomena, running cartoons from 6:30 a.m. until the 9:00 a.m. news. This blog dedicates Saturday mornings toward the same “target audience.” Here is a recommendation for the kid or grandkid in your life:

In honor of National Poetry Month, here is our recommendation for 4/23/22:
One of the “Gutsy Women” mentioned in this wonderful book by Rosemary Rosenfanz, is the poet, Gwendolyn Brooks.



In Gutsy Women, Roenfanz presents gutsy women poets and authors as the daily readings for Thursdays of every week. She heads up her article about Gwendolyn Brooks with a quote: “Poetry is life distilled.”

Brooks lived from 1917-2000, and was “one of the most highly respected, influential, and widely read poets of the 20th century.” In 1950, she was the first African American author to win a Pulitzer Prize ,” which she did with Annie Allen. ” [She] was the Illinois’ poet laureate (from 1968-2000) and the first Black woman consultant to the Library of Congress.”

“After working for the NAACP, Brooks developed her writing in poetry workshops,” publishing her first collection A Street in Bronzeville, in 1945. Her poetry showcased the plight of the Black, urban poor. In later years, she traveled extensively as an activist dealing with “the problems of color.” Her poetry influenced many young, Black poets of the 21st. century.

This book has been a delight to me, allowing me to read about
“gutsy women” of my era, and those who came before. Each day upon reading the short piece on a woman, I think, “You go, girl!” and am inspired to attempt to be “gutsy” in my own life. Thank you, Rosemary, for such a lovely daily “read.”

(This book was reviewed earlier on PWR.)

SATURDAY MORNINGS FOR KIDS ON SATURDAY NIGHT

Thanks, Carla for the fine illustration.

AGAIN, I’m late, but today is because I’ve been enjoying my out-of-town company and taking some time out to do fun shopping. Saturdays on PWR are like the TV programming on 50’s and 60’s Saturday mornings, reserved for the kiddos.

Today’s book is not something I’ve read, but something that showed up in my LFL that I want to read soon.

My LFL (Little Free Library) in my side yard.

This 1987 publication by Louis Sachar, described by School Library Journal as “unusual, witty, and satisfying” had me at the cover–

Louis Sachar is a fine writer.

This cover reminds me so much of the sixth grade boys I taught “back in the day” in my first teaching career. I remember the boy who wanted to “look in the girls’ bathroom” so badly that he removed the cover off the vent in the boys’ bathroom, crawled into the ceiling crawl space, and fell through, landing in a classroom in another “pod” when he explored the school from above. I am sure this is going to be a fun read.

RAE

SATURDAY MORNINGS FOR KIDS…

TODAY’S RECOMMENDATION IS AIMED AT MIDDLE SCHOOLERS

…ON SUNDAY MORNING

Late! Again! Please bear with me, for I have a wonderful author who writes for middle schoolers, and adults whose sense of humor has remained at middle school levels, including yours truly.

I RECEIVED A WONDERFUL GIFT IN THE MAIL!

This gift from a former student, Virginia, arrived in the mail a while ago. I could hardly wait to read the books and recommend them in Saturday Mornings for Children.
6 NEW KID’S BOOKS!
My favorite of the set!

Virginia Jones, a former online student whom I came to love as a friend as well as be impressed by as a student, sent me a set of books by a beloved children’s author in Britain, equivalent in popularity to of The Diary of a Wimpy Kid series here in the U.S. Stationed in England, she calls me often to check on me and tells me about her latest academic adventures. She is an amazing individual and a good friend. She follows my blog, and when she told me about this British author, I thought I should feature Williams on my Saturday Mornings for Kids post. Never did I dream she would provide me with the means of doing so.

My sense of humor has never progressed beyond middle school, and for that I am not embarrassed, but grateful. This series made me laugh out loud at the “proper British tones” in which it is written and nearly choke at the outrageously funny illustrations. Here’s one from my favorite book in the box, Awful Auntie.

Awful Auntie herself, in all her “glory”

When I googled the author of this hilarious set of books, I discovered I already “knew” him from watching “Britain’s Got Talent” on TV. There, he is a judge for unusual acts trying to hit the big time in Great Britain. My estimation of this “celebrity” has now climbed sky-high after reading his books. Out of five stars, I would have to give this series a 6.

Thanks, Evin

A LOVELY PICTURE BOOK THAT TEACHES A LESSON

THANKS, CARLA FOR THE LOAN OF YOUR MEME.

This Caldecott Honoree is a lesson in being proud of one’s heritage even if others don’t understand.

Dedicated to her parents, this book’s author tells a story of her childhood.

Written by Andrea Wang and illustrated beautifully by Jason Chin, the book tells the story of a drive that enabled the girl’s parents to stop by the side of the road and pick free watercress. Seeing a busload of her school friends go by, the girl is embarrassed by her parents and their family’s scavenging. As mom prepares the watercress, the girl imagines her friends making fun of her and her frugal parents . Her mom reminds her of how as a child in China, she had nothing to eat during a time of great famine, and tells her daughter she would have been glad to have the watercress. Ashamed, the girl tries the watercress and finds it delicious. The whole family is aware of memories, and as they eat the watercress, they make new memories of their own.

The lovely illustrations, including the expressions on the characters’ faces, carry the story along, letting the reader know at all times what the girl and her family are feeling. It is an inspiring book, one which carries a message and teaches a thoughtful lesson.

READ WITH YOUR KIDS TODAY!

Rae

SATURDAY MORNINGS FOR KIDS ON SUNDAY MORNING

Thanks for the meme, Carla.

Late again! Yesterday was a very full, very busy day, and I am just getting around to recommending this wonderful book for kids and adults alike.

The story is as special as its cover!

Clara’s dad, Marc owns a very special cafe in Flowers, Kansas. Clara knows that the Van Gogh Cafe is where magic happens. Many special events happen that involve the whole town and that change the whole town: like the wayward sea-gull’s appearance, the possum’s visit, or the magic muffins which arrive just when they are needed most. Lively, warm, and magic, each chapter’s vignette adds to the revealing conclusion which helps the reader learn that the secret of the magic at the Van Gogh cafe is L.O.V.E.