SUNDAY (EVENING) POST

Ok, so my Sunday post is being written on Monday evening.  Believe me, it has been a hectic weekend and a busy, busy Monday.

What I finished last week:

Half Broke Horses by Jeanette Walls, author of Glass Castle; My new second Thursday book club’s selection, The Boston Girl; A wonderful novel by a blogging friend, James Cudney, titled Watching Glass Shatter; Anne Lammot’s beautiful essays, all focused around sewing, Stitches; Dragons: Fearsome Monsters from Myth and Fiction; Sandra Cisneros’ book of love poems, Loose Woman.

Continuing to read:

My “grandson’s” dissertation; Max Lucado’s Anxious for Nothing

Begun:

An attempt to get back to my Lit major roots, Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, and Renaissance: The Nora White Story by Yecheilyah Ysrayl; Another inspirational book by John Ortberg, I’d Like You More if You Were More Like Me

Finishing and/or reviewing these books ought to be plenty to keep me busy through Thanksgiving.  I’m really looking forward to the holiday.  We are spending it at my “grandson’s”. What are your plans for Turkey Day?

 

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Sunday (Evening) Post

After many months of posting Every Other Sunday (Evening), school and life has calmed down enough to where I’m ready to go back to posting a catch up each Sunday evening. School is not out yet, but Thanksgiving is just around the corner, and the big assignments are basically behind us in both Freshman Composition at the local college and in Advanced Writing at the university. I even find myself reading more and enjoying a few stress free days in a row at times. Now isn’t that nice!

Here’s what I finished since the last Every-Other Sunday (Evening) Post:

The Resurrection of Joan Ashby, an outstanding debut novel (reviewed in the post prior to this one on PWR); Half Broke Horses by Jeannette Walls a novel based on the unique life of the author’s grandmother, which will be reviewed later this week; A Man Called Ove, our Third Tuesday Book Club’s selection for November and Twice Upon a Time, a children’s book, both of which will be reviewed soon on this blog.

Still continuing to read:

The Grouchy Grammarian, a grammar handbook which illustrates the most common errors in print, enough to make any grammar-lover grouchy, and my “grandson’s” dissertation which I put down to get on with my “Color Coded Challenge,” which I will report on and update in another post.

What I began this past week:

The Boston Girl, a 2014 fast read by Anita Diamond, the selection for November in my second reading group which I shall participate in for the first time this coming Thursday. No worries, I have about one hundred pages to go, and the story is so captivating that it will be a pleasant “chore” to finish.

So, I have a fine week of reading and teaching ahead with doctor’s check-ins and appointments behind me for a while, and a great deal to look ahead to. The Holidays are rapidly approaching, and already my house is decorated for Thanksgiving with my favorite kind of cooking and celebrating to come. It is indeed a time to be grateful and to give thanks for so, so many blessings!

SUNDAY (EVENING) POST

It’s been a while since I’ve done a Sunday (Evening) Post, and this one will be a catch up and shout to all those sending good wishes and prayers through the post during Hurricane Harvey.  We have been dealing with Harvey and his repercussions since August 24th, and today is September 3rd, the day before the Labor Day Holiday.  Many of our friends will be doing hard labor rather than holidaying, bailing out their houses (those who can even reach them), ripping up carpet and dragging dead limbs and sawed-up trees to the dumpsters and piles around town.  Our biggest problem here in northern Brazoria County has been flooding, flooding unseen before even in 1979 when Tropical Storm Claudette dumped 29 inches of our little town of Alvin in 24 hours. And of course, the huge Texas-sized mosquitoes are loving it.

My Better Half and I had started school at the local community college on the 21st.  He had met his students four times, I, two times.  Had we known we weren’t coming back for a while, we would have said more to them, but it wasn’t even raining on the 24th, and Harvey was the name of an invisible rabbit in a Broadway play/Jimmy Stewart movie. The rains began on Friday, the 25th, and as Paul Harvey used to say…”The rest is history.”

My beginning class at UHCL for the semester was postponed from the 30th of August to September 6th.  During this time, the TV became too stressful, and I turned to reading…mostly escape fiction. LOL

What I finished: All The Birds in the Sky by Charlie Jane Anders (reviewed on this blog), The Star Place by Vicki Grove (reviewed recently), and The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman (to be reviewed soon).

What I continued to read: Our America by Filipe Fernandez-Armesto, a Latin American History of the United States.  I have to admit that the only non-fiction I read during this time were the Houston Chronicle and the Alvin Sun, once they were up and running again and the delivery to our flooded town could be resumed.

What I began: Steven King’s Wizard and Glass,fourth book of “The Dark Tower Series,” a book I had skipped and gone on to book five (skipped because I was intimidated by the 893 pages…I am now on page 491).  I have completed book five and book six, and will have to read King’s “catch-up pages” before going on to book seven, the final book in the series. My Better Half read them all in order and finished book seven during the storm. Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz, loaned by a friend, has provided a good respite from “heavy reading” although pondering the meaning and secrets of the universe through the eyes of two fifteen year olds can be pretty demanding (in a good way).

And, I have cooked–creatively depending on substitutions during shortages when food trucks couldn’t get through.  One thing I WILL purchase soon is powdered milk. There still is no milk on the shelves in Alvin. Actually, instead of starving, we probably have gained weight, eating comfort foods and snacks several times a day.

I hope this finds my followers well, dry, and in their own homes–and READING!

SUNDAY (EVENING) POST

This has been an “off week”, and I took advantage of it by making it a reading week. Tuesday through today (Sunday) my main activity has been reading.

I have finished:

Who Is the Human? by Gary Pegoda — Reviewed recently on this blog.  Good sci-fi action.

The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend by Katarina Bivald–Reviewed recently on this blog.

Setting Free the Kites by Alex George–a recent library impulse selection chosen because it was large print and thoroughly enjoyed.  To be reviewed on this blog soon.

The Devil’s Highway by Alberto Urrea–Reviewed recently on this blog.

Continuing to Read:

Set aside temporarily, Garth Stein’s A Sudden Light

My non-fiction attempt to expand my genre preferences, bell hooks’s Feminism is For Everybody: Passionate Politics  I have barely begun, but I feel I should read bel hooks.

A book recommended by a fellow blogger at Brainfluff, The Keeper of Lost Things by Ruth Hogan
A Kindle Purchase written by a blogging friend Notes from a Small Dog by Ani

Watched:

The rest of the TV series, “Genius”, the story of Albert Einstein’s life and work

Rick Steves’ Europe on PBS, Went to Germany, twice; Scotland; parts of England.  I never get tired of him as a tour guide nor his show.  We often watch during meals since they are only thirty minutes long.

Movie, “The  Magdalene Sisters–brutal! A true story from Ireland.

Next week brings doctor’s visits and a few fun things as well, and of course, LOTS of reading!

 

Sunday (Evening) Post

Because I read several books at a time, I often finish several near the same time as well. During the past two weeks, I finished the following books:

The Devil’s Highway by Luis Urrea, a story of the US Border Patrol and its policies toward illegal immigrants–This book was one that although non-fiction, read like a novel, and I polished it off in two days.

Sophie’s World took much longer because it was full of philosophy and required thinking about while one followed the plot of an-about-to-be-fifteen year old girl.  It was educational as well as entertaining.

Before We Visit the Goddess by Chitra Divakaruni, a Houston writer I had read before took only a day and an evening, for it was so good that I stayed up late to finish it.

Gary Pegoda’s sci-fi novel,Who Is Human? also took more time because I had it on my Kindle app and was adjusting to the first novel read in that format, because it was very thought-provoking, and because I often found myself slowing down to admire the excellent writing.

For the time being, I had put aside Garth Stein’s (author of Racing in the Rain, a heartbreaking but engaging novel, told from a dog’s point of view) A Sudden Light in order to return Divakaruni’s novel to the library on time.  I hope to return to it this coming week.

I have just begun the large print version of Katarina Bivald’s The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend, also borrowed from the library, which has me laughing out loud and totally delighted by page 355 in just two days.

I did manage to work in the Sunday edition of The Houston Chronicle as my guilty pleasure for a Sunday afternoon, something I reward myself with when I’ve worked hard on various things all week.

I have had out-of-state company all week, and although we have had a lovely time and wonderful visit, I will be glad to have some peace and quiet (they have an 8 year old and a ten year old, brilliant and sweet kids, but exhausting to an old woman like me LOL) before starting teaching summer school at the local college in July. I am sure once the family is out the door I will be missing the happy laughter from the many games of Uno played on the living room floor and the delicious authentic Chinese meals the father of the family has made for us.  I feel like it has been Mother’s Day (week) instead of Father’s Day because of the royal treatment I have been receiving.

I have plans to get some reading done before I get caught up in lesson plans and grading, perhaps I’ll start right now…

Sunday (Evening) Post

It is back to reading, coming with a few rainy days in a row.  I had about finished up several books, so this past few days, I have started a few “new” ones. Striving to work some non-fiction into my reading, my “grandson” loaned me a very readable non-fiction work by Luis Alberto Urrea, The Devil’s Highway, which deals with immigrants’ desperate attempts to achieve a better life in this country and the work of the US Border Patrol.  I am only on chapter two, but am thoroughly “hooked.” I am looking forward to reading more on this book this coming week.

Last week I started a unique review of Philosophy 101 in novel form in the YA “classic”, Sophie’s World by Jostein Gaardner.  The introduction to this, the 20th anniversary edition, by the author is enough to stimulate anyone’s curiosity, and the novel itself is extremely engaging. In a week’s time I have read a little over one half of this hefty, thought provoking, mysterious novel. I also began Garth Stein’s (author of Racing in the Rain) A Sudden Light, also a mysterious, somewhat supernatural novel written in 2014. I am only on chapter seven, which is scarcely into the book, as the chapters are pleasantly short.  All of these books are keeping me reading.  I am also continuing with Gary Pegoda’s Who Is Human?  on my Kindle app on my laptop.  I am definitely going to ask for a real Kindle for my birthday coming up, for the glare does not allow me to read for long periods of time.  The story just keeps getting more and more interesting, and although I cannot predict where it is going, I want to keep reading to find out.

We have been turning the house upside down and inside out, placing new furniture and moving pieces from room to room.  Our sixteen year old cat, Lena, is most upset because nothing is where it used to be (except for the granite topped table in the breakfast room and the large dining room table and assorted furniture in the dining room), and she seems somewhat disoriented and confused.  As long as she has her “box”, food and water bowls, and a window next to the window seat to look out of, I think she will be fine.

The PWR ladies met last Sunday (I was too exhausted to do a Sunday (Evening) Post last week because we had such a good time, and although our numbers were small, we had a lovely visit, and we were able to send attendees home with sandwiches for husbands for supper and various baggies full of “snacks” for the coming week.) It was a matter of quality time, and considering that it was Memorial Day Weekend and many had family plans, I was especially pleased.  Everyone took home some books to read, and a couple brought books to loan and magazines for my Bookworm Club (which will meet in July)which we will use to cut up for vocabulary “projects.”

It was a good week, and the week ahead promises to hold many good things as well. I wish the same for you and yours.

Sunday (Evening Post)

This week has been filled with trips to the mall to visit and walk the mall with a friend from Las Vegas, and going four days in a row (each day a larger percentage off) to an estate sale down the road where we purchased a bedside table in anticipation of visitors from Boston in June and a roll-top desk as an early anniversary present to each other. We also brought some smaller items none of which we needed, but all  nice additions to our house and lifestyles.  Because of the unusual busyness, I did very little reading.

I finished Vanishing Grace by Phillip Yancey, borrowed from the church library, which I returned this morning.  A review follows soon.

I am continuing to read The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas which deals with a white on black shooting and is so interesting that I am halfway to three fourths of the way through.

I started an old book, Tender Mercies by Taylor Caldwell that a friend brought to donate to my LFL when she attended a book party, and I am wondering why I haven’t heard of it before? It is old-fashioned, but wonderful.

I have been cooking this week: Greek lemon-roasted golden potatoes, spaghetti and meatballs, roast beef in the crockpot, and fresh green beans and new potatoes from a friend’s garden.  We are eating well.

It is hot on the Gulf Coast of Texas, hitting 90 degrees, at least, each day with 0ver 85 to 90 percent humidity.  Whew! With washing clothes, taking extra showers, and watering the plants, I dread seeing my water bill!

The Powerful Women Readers’ “Hen Party” is next Sunday, so I have another busy week ahead, shopping and cleaning in anticipation of that. I have read and prepared book talks on all three “assigned” books, but this get together will focus on food, fellowship and fun.