TAGGED

HOW I CHOOSE MY BOOKS

James Cudney at this is my truth now recently was tagged and answered these questions.  I chose to participate in this tag some time ago, but I’m just getting around to participating. If you would like to answer these great, but sometimes hard to answer questions, just put them in the Leave a comment box.  It will expand to allow you to write all you wish.

The questions are paraphrased at best.

  1. Find a book on your TBR shelf that has a blue cover.  What made you pick up this book?    I found The City of Dark Magic by Magnus Flyte (has to be a pen name!). It was at Half-Price Books, and I chose it because of the gorgeous cover that included the words, “madcap novel,” and ” [includes] “a misanthropic Beethoven and a dwarf with an attitude.” I may not get to it any time soon, but I am sure it will be a “different” kind of read.
  2. What was a book you didn’t expect to like but did? Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert was something I felt I should read, but I was not looking forward to any non-fiction book.  Boy was I surprised by how much I enjoyed it.
  3. Pick a book at random.  How did you discover it? I Can’t Believe My Cat Did That, part of the Chicken Soup for the Soul series.  It was a gift.  It is still in the wrapper, but I know I will enjoy it, and it be the perfect pick-up-put-down book.
  4. Pick a book that someone personally recommended. What did you think of it? Debbie Nance, who writes Readerbuzz and is a personal friend recommended Lab Girl. I enjoyed it so much that I joined her in recommending it to our Third Tuesday Book Club we both belong to.
  5. Discuss a book you discovered through YouTube or a book blog. My blogging friend at Brainfluff recommended Keeper of Lost Things, a 2017 publication on her blog.  Am I ever glad I took her advice.  See her review of it or mine (on this site) fairly recently.
  6. What is a book with a one word title, and what drew you to it? Commonwealth is my choice.  What drew me to it was that I was raised in the Commonwealth of Virginia, and I knew from Deb Nance’s review part of the story was set in Virginia.
  7. What is a book you discovered from the TV or film adaptation?  I honestly can’t think of one.
  8. What are your all-time-favs? When did you read them and why did you pick them up?  You really don’t want to read another ten or twenty pages, do you?  What I’m reading at the moment is my “temporary” favorite.

Tuesday Teaser

This meme was originally begun by The Purple Booker.  I discovered it on my blogging friend’s blog, Brainfluff.  Both are worth a look into.

The idea is to select at random a sentence or two that will entice the reader to find out more about the book you are reading and maybe read that book himself/herself.

Today’s Tuesday Teaser is from The Address, a novel about the mysterious stabbing death of the architect of The Dakota, an infamous luxury apartment house in New York City. It comes near the end of the book:

“‘You’re ill, let me help.’ Sara put her arm around the woman, who leaned into her.

‘I feel faint.’

No wonder, returning home to find your husband’s lover hanging about in the children’s nursery.”

It is NOT as it seems at first glance .as you will guess if you know that The woman who almost faints is the architect’s wife, and Sarah is his mistress.

Review Memes For Ya!

The Write Stuff

Reviews? Need some? (Who doesnt’?) Here are four memes I created over the last year or so. Feel free to save and use as you will. I’m planning to do a few more with a bit more info on them, and will share when I get them done. In the meantime, hope you can use these here and there. (No need for attribution. I share these freely with anyone who wants to help get the word out.)

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Every-Other-Sunday-(Evening)-Post

It has been a grueling week, almost too much to handle, but The Good Lord and help from My Better Half and my cleaning friend, Carmen, got me through.  I had direct orders from my “grandson” to “do something fun,” so yesterday we went to our default family grill just up the street about a mile and had a light breakfast- -light for Diana’s, which usually offers a Country Boy Breakfast–use your imagination. Then we went to a nearby town to an estate sale. We bought a few useful items (no big purchases) and decided to return Sunday at one to see if the massage chair (which we don’t  really have room for) was still available and like all other items Sunday ,75% off.  We went back today after church, and it had been sold.  I did find some jewelry I couldn’t live without (at 75% off, remember) and a nice, white bookshelf for $7.50, a steal!

This past two weeks I finished reading the following:

The Good American, a coming-to-America-story, which I reviewed recently on this blog.

Jo Jo Meyer’s Paris For One,a novelette accompanied by several short stories which was good pick-up-put-down, escape reading.  This will  be reviewed this coming week.

I continued to read:

Poetic Rituals by Ritu Bhatal, a blogging friend ,who offers welcome relief from the stress and angst of daily life. I am reading her poems about love and its various forms right now and enjoying them immensely.

Daughter of Time (which is Truth), mentioned last time, which I will probably finish tonight or tomorrow.

The second novel of a friend, The Address, written by Fiona Davis, a New York, NY dweller who writes about famous buildings that are not only settings but practically  characters in her stories and mysteries. I should finish it this coming week.

Notes from A Small Dog by Ani , the dog, and told from her and her owner’s points of view.  It is on my Kindle app, and I should finish it soon. Look for a review.

I have begun Our America: A Hispanic History of the United States by Felipe Fernando-Armesto, my sole attempt to read more non-fiction besides the heart-warming book by Ani.

What I watched:

Very little TV

The Shack, which I read in print years ago, and was surprised to find I liked the movie MUCH better (probably because of the actress who played God, the “Father” part of the Trinity.  I also liked the actor who played Jesus, The Son, as well, especially since it was played by an Arabian-ethnic actor. The younger woman who played The Spirit, the third part of The Trinity ,was excellent also, much better than in the book, where the Spirit reminded me of Ariel or Tinkerbell.

Most of the time I was watching or reading was out of defense from all the school-related reading and work I was doing.  Thankfully, books and the movie provided me with an outlet and a release from the stress I was putting on myself. With two days of R&R and two “fun things” plus a little “cooking for therapy,” I feel like I am caught up and ready to face another week and “Go get ’em.”

Mental Health Tips for Women

When Women Inspire

Many people tend to ignore their mental health because they believe mental issues only happen to people with disorders. This is far from true. We all need to take some responsibility for our mental health to ensure it’s as good as possible. There are lots of things that can affect mental health, including our work and home environments and what we eat and drink. So, if you’re conscious of the fact that you need to care for your mental health, here are a few tips that could help you.

Volunteering to become more appreciative It can help to put yourself in the shoes of someone else. Pexels, CC0 License.

Put Yourself in Someone Else’s Shoes

When life gets a little overwhelming and you have a lot on your mind, it’s easy to become negative and even depressed. It can help to put yourself in someone else’s shoes. We often don’t realize how lucky we are…

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A Coming-To-America-To-Make-A-Better-Life-for-Oneself-Story: A GOOD AMERICAN by Alex George

I love immigrants-in-search-of-a-new-life stories! This one by Alex George, published in 2012 begins in 1904 and narrates the story of three generations (generational, family stories being another of my favorites) and tells the sweep-you-away love story of Frederick and Jette. Young lovers, they discover that Jette is pregnant and must flee the wrath and disappointment of her mother and family and make a married life for themselves in America. They intend to live in New York, but only have enough passage money to book for New Orleans, and through mishaps and misunderstandings in communication, end up starting their new life in Beatrice, Missouri, a fictional town in a very real county in Missouri.

The story is narrated by their grandson, James. Near the end of the book, James uncovers a family secret that rocks his world and reveals his true identity. It is a “sweeping” story that explores a love of music ranging from Puccini to Barbershop quartets, so popular in America in the 1900’s. It deals with family expectations and the consequences when one does not live up to them, expressed throughout three generations.

There are many memorable characters, of whom Jette was my favorite, both as a young spunky girl and as an old, strong matriarch of an impressive family. In A Good American, “Each new generation discovers what it means to be an American,” and each generation strives to be what Frederick  adopted as his major life’s goal, to be a good American.

YA NOVEL, EVERY SOUL A STAR: A Review

Wendy Moss has written a young adult novel that interested me, and I am far from a young adult. She uses an interesting format; every three chapters alternate between the three main characters, Ally, Bree, and Jack.  The entire story is told from three separate points of view. Ally lives at Moon Shadow, a campground where the nearest town is an hour’s drive away. She gives star lectures at this perfect place to view the Great Eclipse as hundreds and thousands of tourists worldwide come to view the solar eclipse. Bree is Ally’s opposite, popular, gorgeous, whose goal is to be on the cover of Seventeen magazine before turning seventeen.  Jack is “overweight and awkward,”raised by a single mom.  He is an artist who daydreams and draws in class and has been given the opportunity to come assist his science teacher camp guide in lieu of going to summer school.

The book is often humorous, very warm, and very engaging. It is about “strangers coming together, unlikely friendships, and finding one’s own place in the universe.” It is not your typical romance, and focuses on friendships instead of sexual attraction.  It is a fast-paced, enjoyable read which kept me up late finishing it.